KAKURETA

mrbrown

ARTIST STATEMENT:

Nothing is permanent nothing is finished nothing is perfect

I show beauty without a face.
Something away from lust, an expression of the moment.

I believe in our strength, that we are capable of more. To free the mind and let the body create.

That a part of beauty is honesty.
Free from the bondage of restrictions. True creativity in a grainy silence.

Creating a new-old world.
With the absence of disturbances.

nothing is changeless nothing is flawless nothing is absolute

nothing is permanent

UKETAMO / acceptance to the core by Bruin Feskens (mrbrown)

Bruin Feskens (mrbrown) 1997 born in Amsterdam The Netherlands but he moved to Cape Town just after his 15th birthday. From a young age he was imaginative and visually orientated. He grew up in a creative family with his mother being a photographer, so he was always supported to develop creative interests instead of focussing on academic results.

Working in film first he had the privilege to fly to Latvia and work on set for a Disney+ tv series. Around then is when he knew it was time to create his own signature but now in photography, which came natural to him. He needed to make the images and stories of his mind a reality. But film had still been a good teacher because it is there where he learned to work the magic of light.

As for the following while he practiced and learned every day to improve his skills and self. Which made him a self taught artist. To mend what he knew from cinema with photography. He also learned that he suffers from a colourblindness. This forced him to look for another direction. Monochrome photography.
Little did he know that he would stumble upon his new life purpose.
His Ikigai. A Japanese ideology meaning ’finding joy in life through purpose’.

Always drawn to the subtleness in imagery he felt he was attracted to the beauty of the multicultural South Africa, himself originating from cold north western Europe but also feeling strongly inspired by Japanese culture and ideologies. With his work recognising beauty in humble simplicity, seeking spiritual richness over impulsivity.

Since then Bruin has had a cover story in Moevir Paris as well as a cover story with Marika magazine NYC. Selected in 2021 by Gup new talent in Amsterdam, and his brand-new 2022 collaboration with Gallery KieKieArt in Amsterdam. But most exciting is the upcoming group exhibition he will be a part of for the month of November at Youngblood on Bree in Cape Town. This will be his first show.

PHOTOGRAPHER :  BRUIN FESKENS
POEM BY BRUIN FESKENS 
EXHIBITION @YOUNGBLOOD 

2022-11-02T18:45:30+00:00November 2022|

NOT FROM HERE

“NOT FROM HERE is an ode to the unique South African Karoo landscape.

The film follows two visitants, conjured by their circle, as they journey across the barren desert landscapes.  Stark contrasts are drawn between the figures in motion, set against the vastness of the otherworldly terrain they encounter.

NOT FROM HERE

NOT FROM HERE expresses the unfamiliar, in search of acceptance.

Filmed on location at Tankwa, Karoo, NOT FROM HERE draws inspiration from the area’s diverse environment, and weaves this together with elements of fashion, dance, found sound and visual. 

NOT FROM HERE

The film had its world premiere at the Berlin Short film festival in March 2022,  and had its South African launch and exhibition opening at Brutal Curation in July 2022.”

NOT FROM HERE
NOT FROM HERE
NOT FROM HERE
NOT FROM HERE

Director : Oscar O’Ryan
Art Direction: Louise Coetzer

Visitants: Farnel Smart, Lee Kotze & the Dance For All InSPIRAtions Youth Dance Company

DOP: Oscar O’Ryan
Choreography: Louise Coetzer
Arial Photography: Marcel Maassen
Stylist & Costume Designer: Gavin Mikey Collins
Hair & Make up Artist: Michelle Collins, Magical Artists
Fashion design: Daisie Jo
Editor: Eben Smal
Sound Design: Haezer
Field Recording: Brydon Bolton
VFX: Keshet Alle Karidi
Colourist: Jenine Lindeque

Production Assistant: Robyn Pretorius, With Love Agency
Driver: Mcebisi Dyasi

With gratitude to Allison Hendricks, Dance For All South Africa, Tankwa Tented Camp

Made possible through support from the National Arts Council

2022-07-18T18:29:31+00:00July 2022|

CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 2022

The convenience of having art brought to our screens comes with conditions; the biggest being the inconsistency in the visual depiction that appears on different devices.  The Cape Town Art Fair delivered something of incredible value; art in a more certain form.

THEY STAND IN FRONT OF ART BY ADEL EL-SIWI

The work on display offered a level reception. How we digest and relate to pieces will always be scattered, yet; the size, the height, the colour; all of these physical aspects became a stunningly similar experience on a really big scale.

The benefits of a virtual exhibition are obvious, and not being disputed here.

Not only is accessibility often more open; the online space definitely gives the opportunity of more affordable entry.
But, we now live in a world where you can be sitting in the comfort of your own home, and your own pyjamas, viewing beautiful art, as well as potentially networking and socialising.

But, to be in this large open space, filled to its brims with a vast range of art, was mesmerizing. I spent twenty four hours across four days appreciating the overwhelming effect of being so deeply stimulated. I left, each time, with a happy headache.

As much as I am majorly inspired by visual art; I am in the copy world. This year’s fair was my attempt to submerge myself much deeper into the South African art sphere. I have a way to go with recognising big names, understanding key terms, and being able to recognise cultural influences. But, this year’s fair had an undeniable energy.

We were gathered together to acknowledge, and admire, the result of differing perspectives taking shape in intentional mediums. We collectively digested beauty, and pain, and voices given volume.

The physical engagement stretched beyond standing in front of a piece of work solid in its chosen display. Unlike scrolling over an image online, or attending a virtual installation; the art stayed put for the entire fair.

Attendees were able to walk up to these paintings as many times as they liked.

We could catch glimpses of sculptures when passing between stalls. We could see pieces from varied angles. We could watch others’ reactions, and swap perceptions and takeaways.

And, we could meet and talk to the creators, as well as celebrate beside them as the sold markers were secured in place.

The Investec Cape Town Art Fair delivered a weekend of enrichment; an offer to immerse oneself in a constructed sensory universe. Whether you explored row by row, or like myself, traced impulsive steps until you stopped seeing something new; you were faced with art that changed you.

KAMAL EL FEKY SCULPTURE IN FRONT OF NEDIA WERE ART

2022-03-14T14:58:25+00:00March 2022|

NYAMBO MASAMARA @ DEEPEST DARKEST

Nyambo MasaMara presents Beyond Borders, his debut exhibition, at Deepest Darkest.

MASA MARA EXHIBITION

The exhibition is comprised of a photograph series (with 5/7 on display) and four sculptures. The narrative is set in a post-Apocalyptic space, and follows the bold journey of a lone traveller, with a companion surfacing along the way. The feeling is reflective, explorative and strong.

He describes the series of photographs and altered found object sculptural works as “The embodiment of the Traveling Spirit.

MASA MARA EXHIBITION
masamara
MASA MARA EXHIBITION

“It is the depiction of displacement; ever unsettled, in search of a world that is ready to receive the message it carries. The message of harmony between the past and present. It has moved beyond boarders to find belonging and in the process is learning that it lies within. As it travels between space and time it is weighted by it’s calling to connect this message to a collective that will listen.“

Nyambo MasaMara

MASAMARA

Beyond Borders @ Deepest Darkest

~

On View

Tues – Sat: 12pm – 4pm

~

Extended Hours

Thurs 17 Feb – Sun 20 Feb: 10am – 6pm

MASA MARA EXHIBITION

~ About The Artist ~

Born to a mixed-heritage Rwandan family in 1991, Nyambo MasaMara is a versatile multi-disciplinary artist and fabric designer working across a range of media.

One of 14 children. His journey started when the family fled the genocide in 1994, landing in refugee villages in the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo and continuing to move between Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi.

Although his family returned to their original homestead, in their brutally transformed homeland, the young MasaMara still had many journeys to travel; and it is around those journeys – and the many layers of images, objects, symbols and totems that the traveller is confronted with – that his body of work revolves.

At the age of 13, he was sent overland by his family to join his older brother in South Africa. He currently resides and works in Cape Town.

Nyambo MasaMara can also be found at the Art Fair next weekend at the CTICC.

“After a hiatus brought on by Covid19 and the subsequent lockdowns – Africa’s largest contemporary art fair, Investec Cape Town Art Fair will return to its physical home, the Cape Town International Convention Centre, from Friday 18 to Sunday 20 February 2022. “

2022-02-12T13:36:23+00:00February 2022|

KING NOTHING

Following Variety’s announcement of the ambitious feature film written and directed by Sibs Shongwe-La Mer, Byron Eksteen joined him in his garden to speak about life, cinema and everything in between.

Sibs Shongwe-La Mer

Sibs’s second feature film is a co-production project between his own company LAIKA1991, alongside South African stalwarts Sereti Films, Stage 5, and Storyscope, with international blue chip partners SKGlobal and Ivan Hoe.  What emerged between the two is a surrealist anti-interview that coincides with Sibs’s reality that is often exhilarating and bizarre, an exploration of understanding the multi-disciplinary artist.

Sibs Shongwe-La Mer

In isiXhosa belief the process of twasa is the journey in which one takes in order to become a sangoma.  It is a process that chooses you and you do not choose it; naively put it’s a calling.  With reference and insight provided to me by the poet/prophet by the name of DAT, based in Gugulethu, there are three main elements in which the ancestors speak and exist in: the land, the mountains and most importantly, to this story, the water.  The manner in which twasa, connected to water, would conduct itself would be that the ancestors take the chosen individual into the ocean.  They would forcefully grab and pull the person while blissfully swimming into the ocean showing no consent or remorse.  Done so only to serve out the drive to complete the process in an unforgiving manner.  According to DAT, and the rest that have insight to this process via the water, it is not an easy one:  The process is ruthless, unpredictable, unforeseen, raw and it is beyond one’s wildest expectations.  It is a process that many may not survive.

Sibs Shongwe-La Mer
The person comes out from the water, back onto land, ready to work on the world as a different being. A being with the spirits of the ancestors speaking through them as if they are just a communicator with only a scar in their eye reflecting on the untold, unspoken and unique experience they had. Most importantly, if they survived, they are now back on the land ready to execute what they have been chosen to do.   Awaking, Sibs’s eyes open to a random ceiling that he recognises, as we all do. Leaning over to the end of the messy bed to reach his phone in his jeans, or wherever it was, he looks at the time. Getting up, he considers if he should get a coffee, figuring out if he liked the coffee and if he actually wanted coffee. He then proceeds with his daily morning ritual to get going with the day.  Thinking his mundane thoughts about the script while planning his day “in this small weird French town”, the haunt starts to come back. ‘Ding’ the sight of the metal sheets open allowing him to enter the elevator going down. He is now in this metal box with buttons and mirrors, an awkward space shared with other people all with their heads up looking at the numbers counting the floors. This is all going on while Sibs is still trying to figure out if he likes that coffee, what is to come from the day and how to navigate his way through Toronto.
Sibs Shongwe-La Mer
‘Ding’ the door opens again…It opens to a UFO sighting of flashing lights and energy, his name being called – each tone pronounced with a vulture-like desperation for the money shot: ‘Sibs what do you think?’, ‘Sibs can I have your views on..’, ‘Sibs! Sibs!,Sibs!’… In a split second his whole reality changed. He was in an ocean of cameras all wanting to harvest his creative power so they could get a piece of the pie. All trying to steal his attention and quote him on words that can be used for the story, or even better, to twist up his words to use against him for more hits for the article.
Sibs Shongwe-La Mer

Once the elevator hit the ground floor and opened, it provided an opportunity for them to get their headline.  It started off with one word, then another, then a full stop.  The reality of going through the ocean of success came very suddenly after the last full stop of Necktie Youth.  It became a reality of awakening in an ocean of media frenzy that literally aim to put him on a plinth as a museum piece; as the death of the director will increase sales.  Awakening to a world where they cash in on an artists desperation to be “validated by the system”. “No, no, no;  I write about the shit that’s gonna burn us alive, the shit that if we don’t fix it and if we don’t solve it we will perish, I have no option”. “I do it for the fans and not for no one else” “Fuck the openings, the red carpet and yacht parties and fuck all of that shit and selling out:  While that is going on you can catch me in a downtown tavern in the darkest night of the village and we’ll experience some shit, tell stories, live and go skate after”.

Sibs Shongwe-La Mer
He creates with the tribute to death rushing through his blood as if it came from somewhere only he knows.  The tribute that is on a leash held by the monster of getting it done; best described in the manner of how he tackled being nominated for Le Prix ARTE International for most promising cinematic vision for the screenplay “Color Of The Skull”:  When entering the venue at Cannes after being nominated best cinematic vision for a movie that was not shot yet (it was just a script).  He went back to his apartment and spoke to his beloved support Jenna, who was making lentils at the time, and told her he was there to do whatever he could to share his vision and tragic screenplay that existed solely in his mind.  Having no real clue as to how he was going to achieve that he just did what he had to do.  He put all his effort, energy, mind into the following few days at the festival meetings, giving all he had from the gut, making speeches that were so real it made him break down, giving every inch of his soul to deliver the vision he had for the movie he wrote.
Sibs Shongwe-La Mer
Sibs took home the award. Driven by the magical curse of “if I will die soon, I hope they know I was here” the first words of the piece (Necktie Youth) was a wound he had opened to let it all unfold. A wound he cut open on himself to pay tribute to the death, to life, to the future, to his homies who he used to walk in the maze of boredom with in Egoli’s suburbia, yet most importantly, the wound was cut open paying tribute to the family lineage of great writers in his blood. A wound cut open and now bleeding to the fact that this is all just the beginning and that there are huge projects on the horizon.
Sibs Shongwe-La Mer
Dwelling in a suburb constructed of houses with brown semi-circle stains on the walls from the iron in the irrigation systems (oddly enough the lawns are dead) is Sibs. He is back on the land where his path began. Now locked by the law from crossing the ocean, Sibs just gazes at that line on the horizon, like a voyeur with a scar in his eye from his return while readying himself. Sibs Shongwe-La Mer is no Sangoma, no Hollywood action superstar/ hero or a cultural broker that the South African media wants him to be. In all honesty, after spending a few hours with him talking as creatives I have come to accept, love and understand that ‘it is what it is’ with Sibs Shongwe-La Mer and all he wants to do is write, make some cool shit and celebrate his time to be alive.
Sibs Shongwe-La Mer

PHOTOGRAPHER : SHARDAY SWANEPOEL 
STYLIST & CREATIVE DIRECTION  : CATHARINA VAN WYK
ARTIST/FILM DIRECTOR/MUSICIAN SIBS SHONGWE-LA MER
WRITTEN BYBYRON EKSTEEN  WWW.BYRONEKSTEEN.COM
ORIGINAL CONCEPT : JENNA HISCOCK
COPY EDITOR : JENNA HISCOCK
HEADPEACES CATHARINA VAN WYK
FASHION AFROGRUNGEARMAND DICKER  & HOUSE OF LAIDLAW

2021-04-13T19:57:13+00:00April 2021|

211220

In this humorously peculiar sci-fi interpretation of the year of 2020, director Caroline Viitanen explores the parallels between the year’s astrological events, the concept of rebirth and how the pandemic may have activated a mass-awakening, propelling us into The Age of Aquarius and the next 2000 years of “being in the light”.

Our solar system orbits across a photon belt twice in what is considered a cycle of 26,000 years. This photon belt is the galactic plane alignment of hundreds of billions of Milky Way star systems.  Depending where we are in the cycle, our solar system sits either partly or fully within the photon belt.  It’s said that due to the thickness of the photon belt, we spend 2,000 years “in the light” and 11,000 years “in the darkness”.  Every 13,000 years a Great Crossing occurs in which a purification process naturally happens due to reaching the peak of the photon belt’s field.  This crossing also coincides with the 13,000 year cycle of the Stellar sun and is cause for a surge of photonic light – the highest form of light that is known.

At December solstice 2012, it is said that our solar system fully entered the photon belt field, which interestingly coincided with the end of the Mayan calendar, also working on an approximate cycle of 26,000 years. Because there’s an increase in photonic light, we experience a higher vibrational frequency inside the photon belt than outside of it.  A more tangible suggestion of these elevated frequencies occurring may be the measured spikes in the Schumann Resonance, also know as the “heartbeat” of the earth.

211220

With higher vibrational energy surrounding us, we will according to quantum theory become resonant to these higher frequencies, promoting higher states of consciousness and inducing states of peace, joy, love and enlightenment. The significance of this may be that our collective is enabled to be in a state where the divine feminine and masculine can exist together in a non-binary harmony. Some would call this a Kundalini awakening, others the Zero point, and gazing back at the stars there’s yet another explanation – the astrological ages.

211220

The astrological ages are constituted by periods of 2,160 years, in total there are twelve of these ages which, again, interestingly make up about 26,000 years.  We recently transitioned from one age to another, moving from the age of Pisces – the age of hierarchies, into the age of Aquarius – ruled by awareness, information and energy.  A transition that inaugurated a new cycle moving us from the earth to the air signs and also coinciding with the Great Conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter on the 21 December 2020.

211220
211220

With a New Age comes change and with change comes the collapse of outdated structures.  With collapse of structures comes uncertainty, with uncertainty comes friction.  Friction causes chaos and to say that 2020 was chaotic, I’m sure you would agree, would not be an understatement.

211220

Zooming in on a few events that we experienced astrologically in 2020, we first had the Lunar Eclipse on the 10th of January, a time about authority and showing authority.  Then came the first of three Saturn/Pluto conjunctions on the 5th of April, which coincided with a world consciousness meditation day, where millions of people around the globe meditated together at the same time.  At the 21 June solstice we experienced a solar eclipse, signifying a time of facing death and shedding our old identities in order to rebirth our new selves.

211220

The last major astrological event we have already mentioned – 211220 – the Great Jupiter/Saturn Conjunction. Sealing the end of this deeply transformative cycle and setting the springboard for a quantum leap into this new age of ”Synarchies”, the age of higher states of consciousness, of freedom and collaboration – the Age of Aquarius.

211220

DIRECTOR & WRITER
 CAROLINE VIITANEN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
NICOL DIPPENAAR

STILL PHOTOGRAPHY
CAROLINE VIITANEN
CARL VAN DER LINDE

AFRICA IS NOW MAGAZINE
CHRISNA DE BRUYN

THE CAST
THE QUEEN : ESIHLE DOKOMFANE
THE ALIEN/GUARDIAN : JIHOON CHOI
WORKER 1 : MEGAN WOOLLEY
WORKER 2 : YONELA SONJICA
WORKER 3 : ANTONIA JULIES
WORKER 4 : JESS CAPSTICK-DALE

FASHION & ART DIRECTOR : CHRISNA DE BRUYN
FASHION : VIVERS STUDIO
JEWELERY : IDA ELSJE & PHILIPPA GREEN
SET DESIGNER : SVEND RANDS
LIGHT DESIGNER : MATTHEW MEYER
SPECIAL EFFECTS : FREDDIE SHEN & AXEL HOEBEL
MAKE-UP : ALICE COLORITI
HAIR : RICHARD WILKINSON

1ST AC : RYAN JANSSENS
2ND AC : JANSEN VAN STADEN
GAFFER : BRIAN OLIVIER
SPARK : DANIEL LIECH

FILM EDITOR : ETHAN STORM
FILM COPY EDITOR : VINCENT CLERY

VISUAL EFFECTS : MOTIF STUDIOS
ANIMATION & COMPOSITING : CRAIG PARKER & ANDRE JANSE VAN VUUREN
PRODUCER : JACQUES BOCK

COLOR : REFINERY
COLORIST : DAVID GRANT
PRODUCERS : ANCOIS HUMAN & PETA SYNNOT-MARZETTI

SOUND DESIGNER : DAVID HOUSTON

SOUNDTRACK : YOAV – “INITIATE SEQUENCE”

PRODUCTION : FOLLOW THE LINE STUDIOS & AFRICA IS NOW
PRODUCERS: CAROLINE VIITANEN & CHRISNA DE BRUYN
CASTING: CHRISNA DE BRUYN & CAROLINE VIITANEN
CO-ORDINATOR & BTS : CARL VAN DER LINDE
SET MANAGER : MARK MANDA

SPECIAL THANKS
MOTIF STUDIOS
REFINERY
ENDY FILMS
YOAV
MUTUAL HEIGHTS BUILDING
THERESA BOKS
SKOORSTEENBERG FARM
MY FRIEND NED
TWENTY MODEL MANAGEMENT
NUMERICAL CREATIONS
DROMEX CPT

2021-04-19T11:08:08+00:00March 2021|

NOWNESS

No Direct Flight: The Dream That Refused Me.  An Afrofuturist cipher reframing black cultures through poetry, movement and dance.

Jabu Nadia Newman is a South African photographer and filmmaker whose work is as diverse as her constantly shifting pool of inspirations.  Through boldly colorful imagery, she explores alternative narratives with sensitivity and humor.

The Dream That Refused Me is split across four aesthetically distinct chapters that ties together myths, attitudes, and rituals from across Africa.  Powerful and emotionally stirring, a Xhosa poem narrated by Siyabonga Jim creates draws a narrative line between the ancestral specters and incandescent landscapes created by collage artist Zas Ieluhee.

The story of Africa’s rich cultures and traditions is constantly being retold, remade, and reimagined.  The Ethnicify App segment of Newman’s film, which is a satirical take on influencer culture, highlights how cultural nuances can become lost in translation among the diaspora.  The question remains: If we, as a new generation of global Africans, are meant to embody the hopes and dreams of our forefathers, would they even recognise that us today?

The Dream That Refused Me does not aim to carry a singular message but to exist as a creative expression; a kaleidoscope of colors, shapes, and prints that for those who have inherited the key through birth, culture or education can unlock the film’s abundance of coded connotations.

Read on for an interview with the director…


Can you describe some of the themes of your film?

The themes of this film are collaboration, translation, and interpretation. Through the internet, ideas are constantly being shared and representations of blackness are constantly evolving as well as being appropriated. I wanted to take something as ancient and intrinsically African as storytelling and create a modern and contemporary film exploring old ideas. By focusing on an orator who is performing a poem in Xhosa, we wanted to steer clear of a direct translation.

Guided by Siyabonga, everyone working on the film had their interpretation of the poem; every color, shot and makeup look is a representation of the poem. There are moments of magical realism, Afrofuturism, mysticism, and reality; so many worlds are present with an effortless flow through time and space.

Can you talk us through the decision to have an untranslated Xhosa poem as the project’s driving narrative force?

This came intuitively as I had worked with Siyabonga Jim before and we didn’t feel the need for translation. When the idea for this film came about we worked together to find moments in his poem called “Ubizo” that he could recite. That’s how Siyabonga expresses himself, through poetry, movement and dance.

You gave a lot of freedom to the visual artist that you collaborated with.  How did their input alter your appreciation of the final project?

I think Zas Ieluhee adds so much to the film. It was fun figuring out how to bring their artwork to life. Every layer of collage had a story and connected to different scenes and dancers. Being Cameroonian, they incorporated ideas and traditions from their culture that were related to Siyabonga’s poem. Their collage and artwork brought characters to life in ways I had never imagined. This whole process truly inspired me and my future filmmaking.

In your utopia, what does the future of cinema look like?

The future of cinema is African filmmaking; using traditional forms of storytelling and going back to the simplest, truest form of filmmaking. It’s also a world where there’s more access, where film schools are more affordable, where equipment and mentorship (even film festivals) are more available and more stories are being told.

DIRECTOR :  JABU NADIA NEWMAN    @ROMANCEFILMS
MANAGING EDITOR :  GAVIN HUMPHRIES @NOWNESS
VIDEO COMMISIONER :  KATIE METCALFE @NOWNESS
THE BRITISH COUNCIL
POST :  SIYABONGA JIM
COLLAGE ARTIST : ZAS IELUHEE
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY : DEON VAN ZYL
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER  : ROZANNE ROCHA-GRAY
PRODUCER : DIDI EXELBY
PRODUCTION DESIGN : WENDY FREDRIKKSON
STYLING & COSTUME DESIGN : UNATHI MKONTO
EDIT : PAUL SPEIRS AND THABO NHLAPO
DANCERS : LOLWETHY SDUMO, MTHETHELI DLAKAVU, AMANDA GUMA, CHUMANDE NGQAKOTEY, YOLANDA NTANYANA
HELLO NICE : NATALIE PANENG
CGI MODEL : KIM ZULU
PROPS MASTER : GERALD ABRAHAM
ART ASSISTANT : EDDIE KWONGA
MAKE UP ARTIST : MARCHAY LINDEROTH
HAIR : KELVIN TAKUDZWA
WARDROBE ASSISTANT : SARAH HUGO HAMMAN
CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER : ELMAREE BOHM, KYLE HYDE, JOHNATHAN BAJU

2021-03-16T12:18:11+00:00March 2021|

INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR

The Investec Cape Town Art Fair is a platform that showcases the great diversity of contemporary art from Africa to the world. In its 8th edition, the fair takes place from the 14th to the 16th of February. Africa Is Now will be selling limited prints of some of our work and t-shirts. In anticipation for the fair, here are 10 reasons to to experience art from Africa and the world.

1. TODAY HERE, TOMORROW THE WORLD

New visions of the continent and the arrival of artists from Africa and its diaspora as important participants on the international art scene can be witnessed on the main exhibitions of the Investec Cape Town Art Fair.

TOMORROWS/TODAY will be a curated section about the sociopolitical dynamics of the present day. The guest co-curators for 2020 – Nkule Mabaso (Curator at Michaelis Galleries, Cape Town) and Luigi Fassi (Artistic Director of MAN Contemporary Art Museum in Nuoro, Italy) – have curated a cross-section of the most exciting, emerging and artists from Africa and the Diaspora.

From its inception, the aim of TOMORROWS/TODAY has been to shine a light on emerging and under-represented artists; set to be tomorrow’s leading names. It is open to those working on and beyond the African continent and, as the title implies, the ongoing theme is one of transformation, and experimentation showcasing unorthodox art forms addressing current social and political issues.

2. GOING SOLO

The third iteration of the SOLO section will examine the issue of space: its politicisation through issues of geopolitics, migration, spatial practice and theory, diasporic studies and borders, national and abstract.

In anticipation of the exhibition, art fair director Laura Vincenti says that the theme has been selected to communicate how artists speak and relate to Space in their works and beyond.

“So there is a double theme in one theme — the space inside the artwork, and how the work is placed to interact with space.” The theme of Space also gestures towards broader cultural sensitivities in the sociopolitical moment, in which there is a heated national debate about historical entitlements to Space.

Mary Sibande, The Locus (2019), Inkjet on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, Diasec Mount, 200 x 136 cm

3. WELCOME TO THE WORLD STAGE

The list of great artists due to land in Cape Town is staggering, reflecting on the significance of the moment. With the proliferation of art fairs in the world, the Investec Cape Town Art Fair is the only international fair on the continent. The Investec Cape Town Art Fair stands as a medium for creating a dialogue between the northern and southern hemisphere – it is fair to say that the 2020 edition of the Investec Cape Town Art Fair presents itself as a unique and special opportunity to experience an international platform for artists from all over the world.

The Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020 will happen on what can be described as a veritable world stage, showcasing talent, dialogue and curated display.

4. WELCOME TO THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF ARTE POVERA

Local visitors to the Investec Cape Town Art Fair will be introduced to the wonderful art movement Arte Povera when one of its major founders is exhibited this year.

Experience the complex world of outsider art when it takes this bold step, at the art fair, towards making itself known to the broader art audience.

Africa Is Now - Mohau Modisakeng - Photography
Mohau Modisakeng, Passage (2017)

5. AMERICA ON POINT

Due to be featured at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020, is Haitian artist Andy Robert, represented by Los Angeles-based gallery Hannah Hoffman. Robert is based in Brooklyn, New York, and his large-scale, experimental paintings pick apart our visual reality so that we may examine the minutiae of life. The Investec Cape Town Art Fair will again host the American gallery Hannah Hoffman, forging a path for intersectional dialogue down South.

New York-born artist Amelia Etlinger, represented by Osart Gallery in Milan, was an artist associated with the Fluxus movement, visual poetry and the Italian Poesie Vivisa community. Etlinger moved with her family to Clifton Park, New York in the late 1960s. Etlinger regarded herself as a poet; after reading E.E. Cummings, she started to create visual poetry that evolved into elaborate and collaborative works of natural material collected in the woods behind her house as well as fabric, thread, beads, costume jewellery, Japanese papers, and other found material.

At the same time, Los Angeles-born artist Riley Holloway will appear on the SOLO platform of the Investec Art Fair 2020. Represented by German gallery Lars Kristen Bode, Holloway is a prestigious Hunting Prize finalist. A figurative painter, he works out of Dallas but was born in Los Angeles. In his paintings he examines Black masculinity and asks us to imagine a world where dignity is not a privilege but a right.

6. WASTE NOT WANT NOT

Taking cognisance of our overburdened planet a host of artists exhibiting at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020, are using the detritus of human life as inspiration or raw material for their work.

Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos, represented at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair by gallery Mimmo Scognamiglio in Milan, Italy. In her work she re-contextualises and de-contextualises existing objects; and is known for making a chandelier out of tampons. She rose to prominence after exhibiting at the 51stVenice Biennale in 2005, was the first woman and the youngest artist to exhibit at the Palace of Versailles, and has had a solo show at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao.

Congolese artist Patrick Bongoy (represented by EBONY/CURATED of Cape Town) who will exhibit his creatures created from rubber and hessian. The Cape Town based artist’s work is a response to the global reality of literal and figurative environmental pollution. This encompasses the entire spectrum from the erosion of economic viability, the impact on a community and individual behaviour and socio-cultural decay of the rural and urban landscape.

Nigerian artist Nnenna Okore, represented by German gallery, Sakihle&Me, has received international acclaim for her richly textured abstract sculptures and installations. Her highly tactile sculptures respond to the rhythms and contours of everyday life, combining reductive methods of shredding, fraying, twisting and teasing with constructive processes of tying, weaving, stitching and dyeing. Inspired by forms, topographies, and phenomena related to place, memory, time, and language, she invites her viewers to consider and encounter earthly structures more delicately. She is deeply concerned with earth’s vulnerability amidst the wave of climate disaster in its path. In her works, she romanticizes nature’s sublimity and the essence of life.

Wole Lagunju, The Performance (2018), Oil on Canvas, 180cm x 152cm
Wole Lagunju - Africa Is Now Magazine
Wole Lagunju, Ancestry (2018),Oil on Canvas, 76cm x 61cm

7. IT’S ALL TALK

It’s time again for the art-going public to hear and be heard. It is customary in the art world to give artists, curators, gallerists and specialist collectors a platform upon which they can interact. Tumelo Mosaka will return to Investec Cape Town Art Fair in the capacity of guest curator for Cultural Platforms and the Talks Programme.

Commenting on the contribution of a strong Talks Programme to Investec Cape Town Art Fair, Mosaka says, “The Talks Programme is a perfect platform to explore various topics engaged by artists. It is the vehicle for generating discussion, and debate about current issues and the marketplace. It provides an opportunity to share and learn from international professionals alongside local specialists.”

Hot topics in 2020 include Philanthropy in Africa, an artists’ discussion titled Constructing Landscapes of Possibilities with Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi and Malebona Maphutse, moderated by Sharlene Khan; discussion between artists Kemang we Lehulere and François-Xavier Gbré of France; Museums in the 21st Century with Adriana Rispoli, an Independent Curator from Italy with Koyo Kouoh, Director of Zeitz MOCAA, and Sonia Lawson, Director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo. Other topics include Investing in Culture and the Quest for Sustainable Art Platforms.

8. NIGHT VIBES

Once again, the hugely successful Gallery Night will take visitors to explore the culture of Cape Town evenings. The Friday night event allows visitors to hop on a bus and tour the city galleries.

Visitors from beyond the Cape, who’ve identified artists and galleries from the city, at the fair, will gain a greater understanding of Cape Town and its diverse offerings.

Film fans are also in for a treat as art meets cinema at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020. Don’t miss out on a curated art documentaries sundowns at the Labia Theatre, Cape Town’s renowned oldest cinema. The programme ART.DOC is the most recent edition to the fair’s programme; and is part of an initiative to educate those who are interested in art locally and internationally.

This event is sponsored by The Consulate of Italy in Cape Town, free of charge to all visitors and is on a first-come first-serve basis.

Cross The River In A Crowd - Africa Is Now Magazine
Dan Haltern (2019), Cross the river in a crowd

9. MODERN MASTERS

Expect a foundation course in South African art pioneers at the Past/Modern section of this year’s Fair, which will showcase work by photographers David Goldblatt, Peter Magubane and Paul Weinberg, a solo presentation by Dr. Esther Mahlangu, as well as a selection of works by the increasingly sought after Amadlozi group, Cecil Skotnes, Edoardo Villa, Sydney Kumalo and Ezrom Legae.

Curated by Cape Town veteran gallerist Joāo Ferreira, visitors can expect a panorama of works from coveted areas of historical South African art movements.

Ferreira’s curatorial statement reminds us that “Artistic expression has always been an accurate social barometer. Past / Modern will draw from South Africa’s history of late colonial, apartheid and post-apartheid years – including artists originating from formal education, community centres, self-taught or cultural tradition, who have reached consensus as to their vital contribution to the evolution of South African art history.”

10. CHAMPIONING CRUCIAL CULTURAL CAUSES

The ongoing Cultural Platform section presents the work of cultural institutions and non-profit organisations who nurture and support artistic production in the region, through exhibitions and artist residencies.

Fair visitors will be struck by the appearance of artwork by the late, great Gerard Sekoto presented by The Gerard Sekoto Foundation, under the aegis of The Norval Foundation.

The NJE Collective of Namibia, an artist-run collective initiated for artists from Southern Africa in general, will present three artists: Rudolf Seibeb (Namibia), Chuma Somdaka (South Africa) and Jo Rogge (South Africa / Namibia).

The organisation Eh!Woza will screen youth-made films examining the local HIV and TB co-epidemic. And, from KwaZulu-Natal, the KZNSA, the force behind Durban’s leading contemporary gallery, will exhibit the renowned Derrick Nxumalo and Andile Maphumulo, in a celebration of township and urban life through the expressionistic use of colour and wild geometric lines.

For more information visit investeccapetownartfair.co.za

Fatoumata Diabaté, 2013, Tèmè, L’homme en objet serie, Bamako, Mali, pigment inkjet print
on paper, 39.3 x 26 in
2020-03-10T22:26:40+00:00January 2020|

HINDSIGHTS & FORESIGHTS

Acclaimed artists Johan Conradie and Karl Gustav Sevenster form the artist duo AD-Reflex. Their current work, Hindsights and Foresights is a navigation of moments of unexpected beauty in the mundane.

Africa Is Now Magazine - AD-Reflex, Hindsights and Foresights
SILENCE BEHEADED

‘Of all the forms of wisdom, ‘hindsight’ is by general consent the least merciful, the most unforgiving. With the benefit of hindsight, one begins to search one’s past for such “turning points”, and is apt to start seeing them everywhere.’-
AD-Reflex

<