Moving us to an alternative world, where gender plays no specific role, this fashion story is a collaboration between Blünke Trotse Tert and Shana Morland’s celebration of pink. Though very different, their love and implementation of the colour merges together an otherworldly-ness which is full of boldness and flamboyance. This western-influenced,  modern-day fairyland is expressed through dreamlike ruffles and signature lace. While kitsch and frilled, it is also tailored and precise, merging sophistication with flair. Blünke Janse van Rensburg, aka Trotse Tert “the Lonely Cowboy  collection” transcends gender boundaries to tell a story about self-expression that ignores preconceived notions of masculinity and femininity. The past merges with the present in flamboyant ruffles,  bell-bottoms and remnants of French Baroque. Drama and flair quieten down when combined with Shana’s timeless, dreamlike  creations, which  speak to a stillness in the world. The different approach in the use of pink in both designers, both bold and subtle, reminds us that moments of play fashion are still possible in our contained environments. Read a little more about the artists below:

PINK

AIN:
Tell us about yourself.
Describe yourself in 3 words. Or phrase

Shana Morland:
Passionate about creating, Problem solver & Always seeking happiness.

AIN:
Tell US a little bit about your journey towards becoming an artist.

Shana Morland:
I am lucky enough to have one of the best designers, and mentor at my fingertips. There has been no better person to learn from than my mother, Stefania Morland. She has an amazing appreciation for design and she truly creates art in every garment. Apart from her endless wisdom, I studied fashion Design at CPUT and worked for my mom thereafter.

AIN:
Who/What Do you feel, contributed most to your growth as an artist/designer?

Shana Morland:
I grew up in an extremely arty family. Every house we lived in was designed by my dad and we would move in while it was still a building site. I think this way of living contributed to the way I perceive things now – I want to understand the design, work out how its made and then dive in adding myself to the mix. My love for fashion definitely comes from my mother. During my school career she was a wardrobe stylist for TV commercials and I would spend a lot of my time helping her, which made me want to follow suit. But then in my final two years of high school she opened her boutique and I was hooked from the start! I loved the energy of creating an environment that was uniquely her, and her way of making art through fabric to make every woman who walked through her doors feel their best.

PINK

AIN:
Do you feel the way you use this colour speaks about masculinity/ femininity or the preconceived notions our society has on gender?

Shana Morland:
My main aim with the clothing I make is to allow the wearer to convey to the world the way that they want to be seen. My personal chose of clothing reflects me – my attitude to life and it allows me to convey a message without having to verbally say anything. Society will always have preconceived ideas, but I do think it has loosened the ropes on what was previously considered as masculine or feminine.

AIN:
What do you think of the term “African Designer” and where do you see yourself within this world

Shana Morland:
The term African designer has such a wide scope – In the context of where I was born, and the many generations before me I am African at heart. I also come from a forward thinking Afrikaans heritage which didn’t give me a close connection to any form of ‘cultural aesthetic.’  My clothes are not political, nor trendsetting but my mission is to keep it strictly local and design for anybody who takes into consideration the footprint and story behind the garments.

AIN:
How do you feel about African Fashion’s role on the international fashion platform?

Shana Morland:
I think our design is super strong, as well as our resilience to overcoming any obstacles.

AIN:
What are the challenges you face as a designer in the current state of affairs and economic climate in Africa in general.
Any thoughts on that?

Shana Morland:
As local designers we do face the struggles of lower price points of imported clothing. However, it’s important to always recognise our niche and remain true to this. It’s also important as a designer to listen, evolve and keep up with the direction in which people want to engage with a brand.

AIN:
Which South African artist/designer would you love to do a colab collection with?

Shana Morland:
I’m very much into textile prints – so it would definitely be a collaboration that takes this form. There are too many brilliant artists to choose from so I wouldn’t be able to single anyone out.

pink

AIN:
…Now some questions for the Current Covid situation…
Firstly how did you experience our lockdown? Did it have any significance to how you approach your design process?

Shana Morland:
It’s quite a fearful idea as a business owner, with expenses that don’t change, to be forced to close up shop with not much notice. Also given that Cape Town is very seasonal it all contributed to going into our winter with not much financial cushioning. Looking back, it was a good time to reflect on the business and make decisions on what I wanted to change or establish. My retail shop relied a lot on tourists aswell as events happening, which forced my decision to close the shop and wait out this time and set up a temporary ’showroom’ in a different location.

AIN:
Do you think there’s anything that can be gained by being inIsolation?

Shana Morland:
I do think being in isolation gave us a chance to live life a bit slower and rethink our contribution towards society. It made me think about the things that I love, want more of, want less of and what I have been placed on this earth to fulfil. I am lucky that my career is built upon my passion, but it also gave me insight into what I want to get out of it. I still have so much that I’m looking forward to putting into motion, while remaining true to my outlook on life.

PINK

AIN:
Tell us about yourself  and/or Trotse Tert

 Is she Like an alter ego of sorts?

Blünke:
Yes, Trotse Tert is my alter ego. She is the woman strive to be. Confident, strong, she believes being different is a blessing. She’s empowering, courageous and has endless potential.  Recently, my aim is to find more confidence, strength and worth in myself, Blünke.

 AIN:
Describe yourself and/or Trotse Tert in 3 words. Or phrases

Blünke:
Erg, betowerend, fabulous!

 AIN:
Who/What Do you feel, contributed most to your growth as an artist/designer?

Blunke:
In a world where things are kak and fucked up, why not make some kitsch frilly pretty things to brighten the day.

 AIN:
What’s sparked your interest in fashion?
Or what made you decide to pursue a career in Fashion?

Blünke:
I’ve always been creative and fashion is the medium I fell in love with.  Felt it was the best way to express myself, focus on my strengths and capabilities.

PINK

AIN:
Tell me a bit about the collection featured in this article. I’m especially interested in your choice of this specific colour… Do you feel it speaks of the perceived idea of Male sexuality/femininity/gender?

Blünke:
The Lonely Cowboy Collection tells the story about being bold and expressing your true self and exploring your sexuality without gender boundaries or explanations and restrictions.  Pink is one of my favorite colors, it carries a lot of emotion and flamboyance, that’s what I’m here for, drying your tears and making beautiful creations that your heart desires.

AIN:
What do you think of the term an “African Designer” and where do you see yourself within this world? 

Blünke:
I’m fortunate and privileged to live in this country and to have experienced so many cultures and ideas.  It allows me to be more confident in my design choices and being open to mixing different styles.  It’s a privilege to be an African designer especially in this generation with so many different creatives doing so many exciting things.  I hope to continue growing and building something great.

PINK

AIN:
How do you feel about African Fashion’s role on the international fashion platform?

Blünke:
We deserve more credit and recognition for our ideas, creations and identity.

AIN:
What are the challenges you face as a designer in the current state of affairs and economic climate in Africa in general.
Any thoughts on that?

Blünke:
Ag, I believe that anything is possible through hard work and determination, then that shit doesn’t matter.

PINK
EXPRESSION OF PINK

AIN:
Which South African artist/designer would you love to do a colab collection with?

Blünke:
My dearest friend, Githan Coopoo.

AIN:
Now some questions for the Current Covid situation.. 
Firstly how did you experience our lockdown? Did it have any significance to how you approach your design process?

Blünke:
For the first time the world was standing still, it was an opportunity to rethink everything. It definitely forced me to think about things in a different perspective and to take the time to make some changes that would help me now and moving forward.

PINK

AIN:
Do you think there’s anything that can be gained by being in Isolation?

Blünke:
Yes, I’ve always liked working in isolation, where I can focus on myself and my craft. Although after a while I do get into my own head, doubts can be very overwhelming but then I share my creations with close trusted friends and their validation means everything.

PINK
PINK