MOUNT OLOLEKWE

VELDSKOEN

Since Covid has kept most of us  homebound for the last year or so, I reflected on some of my favourite travels in the last couple of years. One that has stood out is my trip to Kenya where I had the wonderful opportunity to spend some time with the Samburu tribe.

VELDSKOEN
When one thinks of Kenyan tribes, the most iconic or most recognised, is probably the Maasai. The Samburu are however a sub-tribe of the Maasai, and less frequently encountered by tourists. Like the Maasai they too are semi-nomadic pastoralists, with much of their traditions and rituals remaining unchanged, despite encountering Western influences over time.
VELDSKOEN

Leaving behind the bustle of Nairobi, I was excited to experience this way of life first hand.  Arriving at the nature reserve in the north-central region of Kenya, we were warmly welcomed by the tribe.  As it turns out, also in time for a very special ceremony celebrating the young boys becoming men, an event that only takes place every five years.

VELDSKOEN
VELDSKOEN
VELDSKOEN
VELDSKOEN

The overriding reason for my visit was to summit the sacred Mount Ololekwe.  This mountain is of extreme cultural significance to the Samburu, hence best experienced in the company of a Samburu guide. John, the eldest son of the chief, was my guide, and as we set off at dawn, it was evident that he had a lot to teach me about the mountain and all of its wonders.  Although we came from two different worlds, we share a mutual and deep respect for nature.

VELDSKOEN
It was a privilege to gain insight into this tribe – it was an authentic exchange of knowledge, and what better way to share where I am from than a pair of Veldskoen shoes! It makes me smile to think there is now a Samburu tribesman walking around in a pair of lekker vellies…
VELDSKOEN

PHOTOGRAPHER & EXPLORER & FILM BY HENK BRAND @THESECRETADVENTURER 
VELDSKOEN SHOES